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Seau brain was damaged (CTE), family sues NFL


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#1 MoreOffense

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 11:38 PM

http://www.latimes.c...0,1438253.story

#2 jeremy2020

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 11:54 PM

It's one of the many current 'crazes' that people are going through. Instead of looking at real issues like, "These guys were golden gods with millions. Now nobody cares, they have a lot of free time on their hands, don't necessarily have skills or even an idea of how to function in normal society, and generally watch their wealth diminish (even if they're not poor, they're probably not filling the coffers unless they invested very, very well)", we invent a craze like "BRAIN DAMAGE".

That's not to say that ramming your head into something over and over is a good thing, but I think the problems many former players have are much more nuanced than their brains being damaged.

#3 DanInUticaTampa

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 11:56 PM

It's a conspiracy. An nfl coverup!

In all seriousness, I don't know what to make of it.

#4 djsabres

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 01:55 AM

Murder?

#5 Buffalo Barbarian

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 02:02 AM

Manchurian candidate? :ph34r:

#6 TakeYouToTasker

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 02:28 AM

View Postjeremy2020, on 20 August 2012 - 11:54 PM, said:

It's one of the many current 'crazes' that people are going through. Instead of looking at real issues like, "These guys were golden gods with millions. Now nobody cares, they have a lot of free time on their hands, don't necessarily have skills or even an idea of how to function in normal society, and generally watch their wealth diminish (even if they're not poor, they're probably not filling the coffers unless they invested very, very well)", we invent a craze like "BRAIN DAMAGE".

That's not to say that ramming your head into something over and over is a good thing, but I think the problems many former players have are much more nuanced than their brains being damaged.
Wait... so you don't believe the brain trauma studies are real?

#7 MARCELL DAREUS POWER

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 02:47 AM

maybe he suffered from depression and went into a manic psychotic state

#8 Stealth

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 04:00 AM

Sometimes people in their rush to blame other factors fail to realize that sometimes depression is a real illness. It manifests in different ways for different reasons.  Jr Seau seemed like a man who had no idea how to live without playing football. It's why he held on so long when he should've just retired.  He didn't know how to live in the "real world". I know this is a really short sighted version of what may have gone through his head, but yeah sometimes feeling sad, lonely, miserable and uncertain leads people to wanting out.

#9 transient

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 06:09 AM

The report released appears to include only a gross analysis, not the detailed microscopic analysis that will be done at the NIH to evaluate for chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

#10 San Jose Bills Fan

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 06:57 AM

View PostTakeYouToTasker, on 21 August 2012 - 02:28 AM, said:

Wait... so you don't believe the brain trauma studies are real?

View Posttransient, on 21 August 2012 - 06:09 AM, said:

The report released appears to include only a gross analysis, not the detailed microscopic analysis that will be done at the NIH to evaluate for chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

Thank you both.

It may not have been CTE but that conclusion has yet to be drawn.

Yes, it could have been non-CTE induced depression.

"Invent a craze like brain damage."

Incredible.

Edited by San Jose Bills Fan, 21 August 2012 - 06:56 AM.


#11 KD in CT

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 06:58 AM

View Postjeremy2020, on 20 August 2012 - 11:54 PM, said:

It's one of the many current 'crazes' that people are going through. Instead of looking at real issues like, "These guys were golden gods with millions. Now nobody cares, they have a lot of free time on their hands, don't necessarily have skills or even an idea of how to function in normal society, and generally watch their wealth diminish (even if they're not poor, they're probably not filling the coffers unless they invested very, very well)", we invent a craze like "BRAIN DAMAGE".

That's not to say that ramming your head into something over and over is a good thing, but I think the problems many former players have are much more nuanced than their brains being damaged.
There's no question the transition to civilization is enormously difficult for many former players and it's a real issue that impacts their mental health, but just because it is also a factor in these guys' lives doesn't mean the brain injury issue is any less relevant.

#12 OvrOfficiousJerk

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 06:58 AM

View Posttransient, on 21 August 2012 - 06:09 AM, said:

The report released appears to include only a gross analysis, not the detailed microscopic analysis that will be done at the NIH to evaluate for chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

+1 Reading over the report they only comment on whether or not any structures (e.g., brain tissue, blood supply, etc.) were compromised.  To ID CTE or anything of that nature, you would need to stain the brain slides with certain chemicals/antibodies.

#13 5 Wide

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 09:49 AM

Type A hyper personalities suddenly lose the outlet when football is gone.  Their entire life from an early age was centered around the game. When it's  gone, it can have devastating effects making them feel lost and purposeless.  Add to that any physical damage and its a scenario for deep depression.

#14 shrader

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 09:59 AM

View Posttransient, on 21 August 2012 - 06:09 AM, said:

The report released appears to include only a gross analysis, not the detailed microscopic analysis that will be done at the NIH to evaluate for chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

Exactly, your standard county  medical examiner isn't exactly equipped to make that kind of evaluation.  I'm wondering why this story is even out there right now.  It's the equivalent of drawing some blood, staring at it with the naked eye and then stating that your cholesterol is in the normal range.

#15 NoSaint

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 10:13 AM

View Post5 Wide, on 21 August 2012 - 09:49 AM, said:

Type A hyper personalities suddenly lose the outlet when football is gone.  Their entire life from an early age was centered around the game. When it's  gone, it can have devastating effects making them feel lost and purposeless.  Add to that any physical damage and its a scenario for deep depression.

Its definitely a tough thing. When you dig into these guys, a lot of them have been football stars dating back to pop warner. after 20+ years (including their entire adult life and the transition into it), i wont say a lot, but more than a handful of them, just dont have outside identities. they end up holding on too long and beating their bodies up even more. suddenly they are no longer the "athlete" they once were in the physical or societal sense, but very intensely identify with it emotionally.

couple that with the very real issues of brain damages (with the risk going up as they hold on for extra years)..... not good for a very real subset of these guys.

I give a lot of credit to the guys that can pull themselves out of that cycle that comes with being a star. I know most accomplish this, but its definitely not as simple as we like to think.

Edited by NoSaint, 21 August 2012 - 10:13 AM.


#16 dpberr

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 10:36 AM

He didn't have to have a reason.

Human beings do a lot of things for no reason whatsoever.  We're all here using our deduction, abduction and logic but when it comes to taking your own life, rarely are those three components involved.

Rationality is most often post-hoc justification for our actions.  The media must try to rationalize the suicide to justify this man taking his own life.  Must give it meaning.

And sometimes there just isn't any to find.

#17 K-9

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 10:41 AM

View PostSan Jose Bills Fan, on 21 August 2012 - 06:57 AM, said:

Thank you both.

It may not have been CTE but that conclusion has yet to be drawn.

Yes, it could have been non-CTE induced depression.

"Invent a craze like brain damage."

Incredible.

Like hula hoops, pet rocks, and the Macarena, the brain damage craze is sweeping the nation!

I'm at a complete loss of words here.

GO BILLS!!!

#18 Mr. WEO

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 11:22 AM

I guarantee when that poor guy's brain makes it to Boston, they are going to find the CTE.   In fact, i'm sure they are typing up the positive finding on the report already.

#19 jimmy10

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 11:34 AM

View Posttransient, on 21 August 2012 - 06:09 AM, said:

The report released appears to include only a gross analysis, not the detailed microscopic analysis that will be done at the NIH to evaluate for chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

Exactly what I was going to say. What a medical examiner looks for and how they look for it is drastically different than the work to be done by researchers to determine CTE.

#20 Tcali

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 05:56 PM

In defense of Jeremy--in spite of his unfortunate 'craze of "brain damage" wording. He does mention in his post that the prob with these former players is much more nuanced.And he mentions possible sociological factors.
while it is highly likely that long term head trauma will have affects on the brain---it is important to let all the scientific data be gathered properly. We don't know the extent of the direct correlation betw suicidal thoughts and long term head trauma. Many more people need to be studied. Double blind scientific studies need to be run.--And this is for the benefit of those suffering from depression,suicidal thoughts,or the combination of these w a history of trauma. Jump to premature conclusions---and you do no good to many people you are trying to help.
In spite of the amzing advances in medicine these days-there are some fraudulent things like the anti-cholesterol industry etc--where conclusions were drawn before there was scientific proof