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Rashard Mendenhall retires at age 26


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#1 26CornerBlitz

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 06:04 PM

@RapSheet
Profound RT @R_Mendenhall: I haven't said it until now, but rumors are true. In my own words "Why I Retired At 26" http://www.huffingto...6.html …

#2 Dr. Fong

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 06:13 PM

If he wants to be a writer I suggest he disable his exclamation point key.

#3 jboyst62

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 06:16 PM

Strange piece.  I do not understand why he brings some of that up yet saying he doesn't not want to go In to some cliche spin. The always being in the spotlight and wanting to do other things speech is played out. I am not attacking the guy or being negative at all, but many people in their every day life in much lower professional ventures make the same complaints and still perform their jobs.  As for the always in the spotlight statement and the racism he has felt, it will continue. There are always going to be idiots who name call and use race as a weapon. And someone will always recognize him, especially if he parlays his name in to a 2nd career.  Those both sound like other personal issues the guy should resolve that do not relate to football.

But, I do wish him the best.

Edited by jboyst62, 09 March 2014 - 06:17 PM.


#4 RuntheDamnBall

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 06:19 PM

Despite the exclamation points, he is a pretty strong writer.  I wish him the best.

I think we glorify too much the people who hog the camera and win with brute force, and don't champion enough the fact that these are whole people with a lot of personality.  On a similar note, I might root for Arian Foster no matter where he plays.

#5 Oberyn

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 06:42 PM

Interesting to me that people are attacking him for this.  Honestly, his writing and cognitive ability seem far beyond that of his peers (Richard Sherman anyone?), so just let that go write off the bat.  Further, his stated belief that he was not able to be as fully successful as a football player as he could have been due to the entertainment aspect is still a fairly new point.  I mean sure, it's not like its NEVER been mentioned before, but to expect people who espouse a viewpoint to be offering one never before stated in the history of humanity is a little unrealistic.

More importantly, he is absolutely correct. The NFL, despite all their outward anger towards New Jersey for daring to allow sportsbetting, knows that gambling through fantasy football is what is driving their popularity, and they go out of their way in every broadcast every day to give us fantasy footballers out information.  Not only that, but they are altering the rules to allow us gamblers to get our precious offense that drives those fantasy football scores; refs are told to call even marginal pass interference, defensive holding ,espite only being a 5 yr penalty, gives a first down (and can basically be called every pass play), and QBs can not be touched as soon as they release the ball (and never below the knees or above the neck).

Of course, the players (the ones who aren't benefiting through the current system anyway) tell themselves that the increase in popularity will increase their paycheck and that makes it ok that the sport they grew up in love with has been destroyed by the all mighty dollar.  But, when you got a guy who doesn't care about the money, you can see why this would frustrate him, and he'd do something like retire at age 26.  

I have a lot of respect for people like Mendenhall, who actually have the gall to believe that they can make a living and be happy without the NFL trading them millions for their bodies.

#6 jboyst62

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 07:48 PM

View PostOberyn, on 09 March 2014 - 06:42 PM, said:

Interesting to me that people are attacking him for this.  Honestly, his writing and cognitive ability seem far beyond that of his peers (Richard Sherman anyone?), so just let that go write off the bat.  Further, his stated belief that he was not able to be as fully successful as a football player as he could have been due to the entertainment aspect is still a fairly new point.  I mean sure, it's not like its NEVER been mentioned before, but to expect people who espouse a viewpoint to be offering one never before stated in the history of humanity is a little unrealistic.

More importantly, he is absolutely correct. The NFL, despite all their outward anger towards New Jersey for daring to allow sportsbetting, knows that gambling through fantasy football is what is driving their popularity, and they go out of their way in every broadcast every day to give us fantasy footballers out information.  Not only that, but they are altering the rules to allow us gamblers to get our precious offense that drives those fantasy football scores; refs are told to call even marginal pass interference, defensive holding ,espite only being a 5 yr penalty, gives a first down (and can basically be called every pass play), and QBs can not be touched as soon as they release the ball (and never below the knees or above the neck).

Of course, the players (the ones who aren't benefiting through the current system anyway) tell themselves that the increase in popularity will increase their paycheck and that makes it ok that the sport they grew up in love with has been destroyed by the all mighty dollar.  But, when you got a guy who doesn't care about the money, you can see why this would frustrate him, and he'd do something like retire at age 26.  

I have a lot of respect for people like Mendenhall, who actually have the gall to believe that they can make a living and be happy without the NFL trading them millions for their bodies.
I am not and will not disagree with anything you're saying here. I was not attacking him. But I am suggesting that he is still a young man and clearly it shows in a few of his statements. I hope he doesn't regret his decision, but it does not look like he will

#7 BarleyNY

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 07:10 AM

View PostOberyn, on 09 March 2014 - 06:42 PM, said:

Interesting to me that people are attacking him for this.  Honestly, his writing and cognitive ability seem far beyond that of his peers (Richard Sherman anyone?), so just let that go write off the bat.  Further, his stated belief that he was not able to be as fully successful as a football player as he could have been due to the entertainment aspect is still a fairly new point.  I mean sure, it's not like its NEVER been mentioned before, but to expect people who espouse a viewpoint to be offering one never before stated in the history of humanity is a little unrealistic.

More importantly, he is absolutely correct. The NFL, despite all their outward anger towards New Jersey for daring to allow sportsbetting, knows that gambling through fantasy football is what is driving their popularity, and they go out of their way in every broadcast every day to give us fantasy footballers out information.  Not only that, but they are altering the rules to allow us gamblers to get our precious offense that drives those fantasy football scores; refs are told to call even marginal pass interference, defensive holding ,espite only being a 5 yr penalty, gives a first down (and can basically be called every pass play), and QBs can not be touched as soon as they release the ball (and never below the knees or above the neck).

Of course, the players (the ones who aren't benefiting through the current system anyway) tell themselves that the increase in popularity will increase their paycheck and that makes it ok that the sport they grew up in love with has been destroyed by the all mighty dollar.  But, when you got a guy who doesn't care about the money, you can see why this would frustrate him, and he'd do something like retire at age 26.  

I have a lot of respect for people like Mendenhall, who actually have the gall to believe that they can make a living and be happy without the NFL trading them millions for their bodies.
First, good for Mendenhall.  I'm glad he walked away with his body and mind in tact.  He seems like his priorities are unusually straight - and I don't just mean for an athlete.  Few people have that good of a head on their shoulders.

You've used a terrible example with Richard Sherman, though.  He's a guy who earned his way out of Compton and into Stanford with straight As. Stanford isn't known for lessening its standards for athletes either.  Say what you want about some of his antics, but he's as intelligent a football player as you could name.

#8 Dorkington

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 07:13 AM

Good for him. Seriously.

He got out while healthy, and he's valuing things above money. He got what he needed out of the NFL, now he can do whatever he feels like, and as long as he's smart about it, won't be running out of money anytime soon.

Good luck to him. Sure beats getting into all sorts of financial trouble, retiring too late, and having a hard time walking by the time you're 40, while floundering in bankruptcy.

#9 Aaron

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 07:41 AM

Very impressive young man. I wish him all the best.

#10 Saint Doug

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 08:31 AM

View PostAaron, on 10 March 2014 - 07:41 AM, said:

Very impressive young man. I wish him all the best.

He's anything but. Remember, he's found himself in trouble multiple times for the boneheaded things he has written. Let's see...his defense of Osama bin Laden, the US government orchestrated the 9/11 attacks, the way the NFL treats its players is equivalent to the slave trade, his defense of Michael Vick's dog fighting scandal. The list goes on.  You still impressed with him?

#11 Thurmal34

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 10:10 AM

Good read and an interesting perspective. Good for him.

#12 bobobonators

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 10:22 AM

View PostOberyn, on 09 March 2014 - 06:42 PM, said:

Interesting to me that people are attacking him for this.  Honestly, his writing and cognitive ability seem far beyond that of his peers (Richard Sherman anyone?), so just let that go write off the bat.  Further, his stated belief that he was not able to be as fully successful as a football player as he could have been due to the entertainment aspect is still a fairly new point.  I mean sure, it's not like its NEVER been mentioned before, but to expect people who espouse a viewpoint to be offering one never before stated in the history of humanity is a little unrealistic.

More importantly, he is absolutely correct. The NFL, despite all their outward anger towards New Jersey for daring to allow sportsbetting, knows that gambling through fantasy football is what is driving their popularity, and they go out of their way in every broadcast every day to give us fantasy footballers out information.  Not only that, but they are altering the rules to allow us gamblers to get our precious offense that drives those fantasy football scores; refs are told to call even marginal pass interference, defensive holding ,espite only being a 5 yr penalty, gives a first down (and can basically be called every pass play), and QBs can not be touched as soon as they release the ball (and never below the knees or above the neck).

Of course, the players (the ones who aren't benefiting through the current system anyway) tell themselves that the increase in popularity will increase their paycheck and that makes it ok that the sport they grew up in love with has been destroyed by the all mighty dollar.  But, when you got a guy who doesn't care about the money, you can see why this would frustrate him, and he'd do something like retire at age 26.  

I have a lot of respect for people like Mendenhall, who actually have the gall to believe that they can make a living and be happy without the NFL trading them millions for their bodies.

The hypocrisy behind online gambling is amazing. Forever online gambling was illegal in NJ and now there are banners everywhere on highways and the radio has gambling commercials non-stop, followed of course by their lovely "gambling problem" disclaimer. In a split second it goes from bad to awesome.

Continuing to describe sports gambling as evil and something that would corrupt sports is a waste of breath.  Every sports show on TV and the radio and every newspaper addresses "spreads" for games on Sundays.  Can someone tell me what exactly is the point of discussing "spreads" if not for sports gambling?  Anyone? Anyone? Anyone?

Sports gambling is a reality and making it legal would not corrupt sports any more than they already are.

Edited by bobobonators, 10 March 2014 - 10:23 AM.


#13 KD in CT

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 10:33 AM

Wishing Rashard a very happy retirement!  I'm sure he'll be very happy!


View PostDr. Fong, on 09 March 2014 - 06:13 PM, said:

If he wants to be a writer I suggest he disable his exclamation point key.



#14 oman128

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 11:08 AM

Good for him. Maybe he can actually use his college degree.   Fans, seem to care about guys who play 10 or 15 years and have all kinds of stats and wins.

but in the last few years there been a few guys but walked away from the game for a variety of reasons.

With head injuries becoming greater and greater everyday walking away without your brain scrambled seems like a pretty good idea.

Good luck in your next career.

#15 FireChan

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 11:46 AM

View Postkas23, on 10 March 2014 - 08:31 AM, said:



He's anything but. Remember, he's found himself in trouble multiple times for the boneheaded things he has written. Let's see...his defense of Osama bin Laden, the US government orchestrated the 9/11 attacks, the way the NFL treats its players is equivalent to the slave trade, his defense of Michael Vick's dog fighting scandal. The list goes on.  You still impressed with him?

Opinions?!?! Burn him!

#16 Mr. WEO

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 12:10 PM

View PostFireChan, on 10 March 2014 - 11:46 AM, said:

Opinions?!?! Burn him!

Well....a lot of the racist tweets came his way after he ventured his conspiracy theory regarding 9/11.  Not sure what he expected from the twittersphere.

Anyway, he can now devote his time to finding the Truth(er) about that day...and writing about it!!!

#17 John Adams

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 12:10 PM

I'd suggest that Rashard is a LONG ways from a professional job as a writer.

Setting aside his overuse of filler adverbs like "kind of" and "really," he can't even be bothered to submit or at least catch errors in his work:

Quote

The truth is, I don't really think my walking away is that big of deal.

Missing the "a" there is not huge, but this will be his most read work ever and he can't even catch the error. Not a good sign.

The exclamation marks show how little he understands the written word. That's fine because he's 26 but you don't just become a writer. It takes many years.

#18 Dorkington

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 01:27 PM

Luckily for him, he should be rich enough to afford to "fail" as a writer for some time to come. It's a good position to be in.

#19 jboyst62

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 01:44 PM

View PostJohn Adams, on 10 March 2014 - 12:10 PM, said:

I'd suggest that Rashard is a LONG ways from a professional job as a writer.

Setting aside his overuse of filler adverbs like "kind of" and "really," he can't even be bothered to submit or at least catch errors in his work:



Missing the "a" there is not huge, but this will be his most read work ever and he can't even catch the error. Not a good sign.

The exclamation marks show how little he understands the written word. That's fine because he's 26 but you don't just become a writer. It takes many years.
I agree. And you're a good case for good writing. I am sure we have disagreed on at least 2 topics that I remember.  But you can create an argument that holds no truth, no validity or honest beliefs by writing efficiently to communicate a point and doing so in way that is nicely written with grammar and spelling.  those mean a lot.

#20 earthtobrint

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 04:29 PM

On the other hand, fantasy owners rejoice.  Andre Ellington might finally get the touches he deserves.