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outdoor water spigot issue


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#1 Corp000085

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 12:59 PM

I have two outdoor spigots and they had previously had restrictor valves on them.  The valves were brass, and the spigot was brass.  The rubber inside the valves was failing, so i decided to remove them.  They were VERY VERY hard to remove.  Since the spigot is attached to flex hose into the house and cemented to the brick, i was very very careful to use a 2nd vice grips to apply counter pressure.  After a long struggle, i was able to unscrew them.  I did not do it in a jerky manor, nor did i feel or hear the valves skipping or stripping threads.  There was no brass filings inside the valves when i took them off.  Here's the problem.  On both spigots, the brass threads have been stripped down, probably when the valves were installed before our time at this house (> 4 years ago).  I am now unable to screw in my hose reel or any decent hoses. The only one that works is one with a cheap plastic screw down.

I've tried teflon tape, doesn't work...  Short of removing the whole spigot, is there any way to rethread those things so they work properly?  Is there another option (like soldering a new female end directly over top of the old one?

#2 ExiledInIllinois

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 07:18 PM

You probably want to remove the whole bib (spigot)... They have to make a die that would cut new threads, just not sure where you would find one for a standard hose bib...

Probably easier in the end, then again it was cemented and you have hose in the house... Believe it or sometimes what works faster for the builder isn't really that fast and in the long run, gives you more headaches...

Do you have a basement where you can access the other side?

#3 Corp000085

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 07:48 PM

View PostExiledInIllinois, on Apr 27 2008, 08:18 PM, said:

You probably want to remove the whole bib (spigot)... They have to make a die that would cut new threads, just not sure where you would find one for a standard hose bib...

Probably easier in the end, then again it was cemented and you have hose in the house... Believe it or sometimes what works faster for the builder isn't really that fast and in the long run, gives you more headaches...

Do you have a basement where you can access the other side?

the spigot on the front is cemented into the brick, and i cannot access the other side.  We are on a slab.  If things get really bad, i can drill a hole inside the house.  The other end of the spigot is located in a cabinet in our powder room.  The back of the house spigot is mounted on vinyl siding, so that one will be easy to replace.

#4 ExiledInIllinois

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 08:03 PM

View PostCorp000085, on Apr 27 2008, 07:48 PM, said:

the spigot on the front is cemented into the brick, and i cannot access the other side.  We are on a slab.  If things get really bad, i can drill a hole inside the house.  The other end of the spigot is located in a cabinet in our powder room.  The back of the house spigot is mounted on vinyl siding, so that one will be easy to replace.


Ohhh... I see why you just want to get those threads working properly...

Be careful with any soldering since the heat may damage the plastic down the line???  Still you can get a die and recut those threads I take???

Or maybe... If you get an adapter and then use plumber's epoxy to secure it and seal it from leaks... An adapter like this ($3.49):

Hose Bibbs... Notice Anti-Siphon Vac Breaker

At here:

Plumbing Supplies

Notice it has an anti-back flow on it, does your current one have this?  It can't hurt.

The only thing is that you are making it perm and it may not look too "clean"... Which would bug the piss out of me and I would probably end up creating a federal issue to get a whole new piece on there! :bag:  :nana:

Also:

Anybody looking for something that works to pump water when you sump pump goes out doto electrical failure?  These things really work... You will have to use water, but it beats a flooded basement!

Mighty Might Pump

#5 ExiledInIllinois

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 08:13 PM

Also Corp... They claim that plumber's epoxy (you know the one you find in a tube and knead the putty together... Usually has a working time of a few minutes) can be drilled and have threads cut into it...