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#1 slyng1

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Posted 30 April 2008 - 10:53 AM

Unfortunately don't have a link, so have to copy & paste the story here.  (From Bloomberg News).  Apparently scoring to high on this test is a bad thing.  Who knew...

NFL's Pre-Draft Test Raises Too-Smart-for-Football Question

By Aaron Kuriloff
     April 24 (Bloomberg) -- The prospective National Football
League players being drafted this weekend are given a
standardized test to measure general intelligence. They might
not want to take it too seriously.

     In a months-long process of gauging everything physical
about the players -- from their foot speed to catching ability
to chest strength -- the test is the only leaguewide attempt to
measure brainpower.

     In the end, it determines how well a player fits a profile
more than how smart he is, said agent Brad Blank, whose clients
include New England Patriots linebacker Tedy Bruschi and
Washington Redskins quarterback Todd Collins. He helps clients
raise their scores -- but only to a point, he says. Getting a
perfect 50 might hurt more than scoring 20.

     ``If you score really high on the test, they say, `Well,
this guy might be less coachable,''' Blank said in a telephone
interview. ``If I see somebody score in the high 30s, I tell
them, `You've got to get a few more wrong.'''

     All of the 330 or so college players invited to the
league's annual scouting event take the 12-minute Wonderlic
Personnel Test as they audition for jobs in the most-watched
sport on U.S. television.

      Wonderlic Inc.'s 71-year-old test is used by about 7,000
companies to screen applicants for ``general intelligence,''
according to the closely held company's Web site. The NFL began
using the test in the 1970s, following the lead of then-Dallas
Cowboys coach Tom Landry.


                        What Worries Teams


     High scores can earn players praise for being smart. Scores
that are too high can brand them as problematic, said David
Stevens, a developmental psychologist who has evaluated players
for the Redskins, one of several teams that also use its own
testing process.

     ``Teams are concerned with very low and very high scores,''
said Stevens, who designs educational software at Hanover, New
Hampshire-based Symphony Learning, which makes educational
software. ``They want guys that are coachable and do what
they're told.''

     The test was designed with such a spread in mind, said Bill
Geheren, director of marketing for Libertyville, Illinois-based
Wonderlic, a provider of human resources products and
consulting. Psychologist Eldon Wonderlic developed the test in
1937. The U.S. Navy used it during World War II in selecting
candidates for flight training.


                        Offensive Linemen


     Wonderlic helps companies develop a score range for a given
job, then find applicants who perform within those parameters,
Geheren said.

     Scores range from 0 to 50, according to the company, and 20
matches the mean IQ score of 100. Offensive linemen average 26,
the highest, followed by quarterbacks at 24. Running backs get
the lowest, with 16.

     Super Bowl Most Valuable Player Eli Manning, the Giants
quarterback, scored 39 on the test, according to
CBSSportsline.com. Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, who set the
record for touchdown passes in a season last year, tested at 33.

     There are better ways to measure a player's smarts, said
Detroit Lions coach Rod Marinelli.

     ``I've been around a lot of guys now who really like
football and maybe aren't the sharpest knife in the box, but
they find a way to be smart because they like this so much and
they're willing to work,'' Marinelli told reporters.

                      Learning the Playbook

     Any coach or general manager who thinks high test scores
make someone too smart for football is kidding himself, said
Aaron Schatz, editor of the annual ``Pro Football Prospectus''
who also runs the statistics Web site FootballOutsiders.com.
It's hard to memorize dozens of formations and the assignments
that go with each of them.

     ``The biggest difference between guys who make it in the
NFL and guys who wash out is intelligence,'' Schatz said. ``If
you see a guy who's a first-round pick not make it, it's
probably because he couldn't read the playbook.''

     Chris Long, the University of Virginia player rated the
draft's top defensive end by NFLdraftscout.com, who is the son
of Pro Football Hall of Fame member Howie Long, said he found
the test much easier than the College Board's SAT, used for
college admissions.

     ``I thought it was cake compared to the SATs,'' Long said
in an interview. ``For the most part it was just common-sense,
think-on-your-feet type stuff.''


                         Sample Questions


     Sample questions posted on Wonderlic's Web site include:
     What is the next number in the series 29, 41, 53, 65, and
77?
     A: 75. B: 88. C: 89. D: 98. E: 99.
     (Answer: C.)

     Which three of the following words have similar meanings?
     A: observable. B: manifest. C: hypothetical. D: indefinite
E: theoretical.
     (Answer: C, D, E.)

     Long tried to do as well as he could, he said. Combine
officials don't release players' scores.

     Doing well is fine for quarterbacks and offensive lineman,
who are supposed to score well, said Blank, the agent. He says
he advises linebackers and other players who typically score
lower not to exceed expectations.

     ``If we wanted to, we could really coach them and get the
scores a lot higher,'' Blank said. ``If their score is in the
teens, I'm going to get them into the 20s. If their score is in
the 30s, I'm probably going to get them down a bit.''


--Editor: Michael Sillup, Robert Simison

To contact the reporter on this story:
Aaron Kuriloff in New York at +1-212-617-5697 or
akuriloff@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
Michael Sillup at +1-212-617-1262 or msillup@bloomberg.net.

#2 ChevyVanMiller

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Posted 30 April 2008 - 01:33 PM

View Postslyng1, on Apr 30 2008, 11:53 AM, said:

Unfortunately don't have a link, so have to copy & paste the story here.  (From Bloomberg News).  Apparently scoring to high on this test is a bad thing.  Who knew...

NFL's Pre-Draft Test Raises Too-Smart-for-Football Question

By Aaron Kuriloff
     April 24 (Bloomberg) -- The prospective National Football
League players being drafted this weekend are given a
standardized test to measure general intelligence. They might
not want to take it too seriously.

     In a months-long process of gauging everything physical
about the players -- from their foot speed to catching ability
to chest strength -- the test is the only leaguewide attempt to
measure brainpower.

     In the end, it determines how well a player fits a profile
more than how smart he is, said agent Brad Blank, whose clients
include New England Patriots linebacker Tedy Bruschi and
Washington Redskins quarterback Todd Collins. He helps clients
raise their scores -- but only to a point, he says. Getting a
perfect 50 might hurt more than scoring 20.

     ``If you score really high on the test, they say, `Well,
this guy might be less coachable,''' Blank said in a telephone
interview. ``If I see somebody score in the high 30s, I tell
them, `You've got to get a few more wrong.'''

     All of the 330 or so college players invited to the
league's annual scouting event take the 12-minute Wonderlic
Personnel Test as they audition for jobs in the most-watched
sport on U.S. television.

      Wonderlic Inc.'s 71-year-old test is used by about 7,000
companies to screen applicants for ``general intelligence,''
according to the closely held company's Web site. The NFL began
using the test in the 1970s, following the lead of then-Dallas
Cowboys coach Tom Landry.


                        What Worries Teams


     High scores can earn players praise for being smart. Scores
that are too high can brand them as problematic, said David
Stevens, a developmental psychologist who has evaluated players
for the Redskins, one of several teams that also use its own
testing process.

     ``Teams are concerned with very low and very high scores,''
said Stevens, who designs educational software at Hanover, New
Hampshire-based Symphony Learning, which makes educational
software. ``They want guys that are coachable and do what
they're told.''

     The test was designed with such a spread in mind, said Bill
Geheren, director of marketing for Libertyville, Illinois-based
Wonderlic, a provider of human resources products and
consulting. Psychologist Eldon Wonderlic developed the test in
1937. The U.S. Navy used it during World War II in selecting
candidates for flight training.


                        Offensive Linemen


     Wonderlic helps companies develop a score range for a given
job, then find applicants who perform within those parameters,
Geheren said.

     Scores range from 0 to 50, according to the company, and 20
matches the mean IQ score of 100. Offensive linemen average 26,
the highest, followed by quarterbacks at 24. Running backs get
the lowest, with 16.

     Super Bowl Most Valuable Player Eli Manning, the Giants
quarterback, scored 39 on the test, according to
CBSSportsline.com. Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, who set the
record for touchdown passes in a season last year, tested at 33.

     There are better ways to measure a player's smarts, said
Detroit Lions coach Rod Marinelli.

     ``I've been around a lot of guys now who really like
football and maybe aren't the sharpest knife in the box, but
they find a way to be smart because they like this so much and
they're willing to work,'' Marinelli told reporters.

                      Learning the Playbook

     Any coach or general manager who thinks high test scores
make someone too smart for football is kidding himself, said
Aaron Schatz, editor of the annual ``Pro Football Prospectus''
who also runs the statistics Web site FootballOutsiders.com.
It's hard to memorize dozens of formations and the assignments
that go with each of them.

     ``The biggest difference between guys who make it in the
NFL and guys who wash out is intelligence,'' Schatz said. ``If
you see a guy who's a first-round pick not make it, it's
probably because he couldn't read the playbook.''

     Chris Long, the University of Virginia player rated the
draft's top defensive end by NFLdraftscout.com, who is the son
of Pro Football Hall of Fame member Howie Long, said he found
the test much easier than the College Board's SAT, used for
college admissions.

     ``I thought it was cake compared to the SATs,'' Long said
in an interview. ``For the most part it was just common-sense,
think-on-your-feet type stuff.''


                         Sample Questions


     Sample questions posted on Wonderlic's Web site include:
     What is the next number in the series 29, 41, 53, 65, and
77?
     A: 75. B: 88. C: 89. D: 98. E: 99.
     (Answer: C.)

     Which three of the following words have similar meanings?
     A: observable. B: manifest. C: hypothetical. D: indefinite
E: theoretical.
     (Answer: C, D, E.)

     Long tried to do as well as he could, he said. Combine
officials don't release players' scores.

     Doing well is fine for quarterbacks and offensive lineman,
who are supposed to score well, said Blank, the agent. He says
he advises linebackers and other players who typically score
lower not to exceed expectations.

     ``If we wanted to, we could really coach them and get the
scores a lot higher,'' Blank said. ``If their score is in the
teens, I'm going to get them into the 20s. If their score is in
the 30s, I'm probably going to get them down a bit.''


--Editor: Michael Sillup, Robert Simison

To contact the reporter on this story:
Aaron Kuriloff in New York at +1-212-617-5697 or
akuriloff@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
Michael Sillup at +1-212-617-1262 or msillup@bloomberg.net.


That just goes to show you how the NFL completely overanalyzes everything. Imagine too smart being a detrement.

The next time an announcer says, "What they like about this kid is his football smarts," his partner better chime in with "Yeah, but he's not too smart." Sheesh!