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#41 The Dean

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 10:24 PM

This will make everyone sleep better at night :thumbsup:



Sunbelt's response:

http://sunbeltblog.b...and-switch.html

#42 whateverdude

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 06:30 PM

I keep reading that ESET Smart Security 4 scores very high on tests. Anyone use it?

#43 The Dean

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 09:18 PM

I keep reading that ESET Smart Security 4 scores very high on tests. Anyone use it?



ESET makes a very good product. Nod32 has been the darling of computer geeks for quite some time. The same AV engine is used in the Smart Security Suite. I'm not a big fan of security suites, in general, but I think this is likely one of the best. The AV portion is quite good to be sure. I don't know much about the firewall on this suite and the reviews I have read are far from objective and/or thorough. Here's one for what it's worth:

http://www.laptopmag...security-4.aspx

I like that it is being called "light". Most security suites are computer killers (in terms of performance) particularly if you don't have a ton of RAM and a very fast processor. The mere fact that that article recommends Norton's suite makes me question the entire analysis, though.

If you are looking at suites, I'd also consider Avira's suite, Sunbelt Software's VIPRE suite and G Data Internet Security.

#44 whateverdude

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 05:58 AM

ESET makes a very good product. Nod32 has been the darling of computer geeks for quite some time. The same AV engine is used in the Smart Security Suite. I'm not a big fan of security suites, in general, but I think this is likely one of the best. The AV portion is quite good to be sure. I don't know much about the firewall on this suite and the reviews I have read are far from objective and/or thorough. Here's one for what it's worth:

http://www.laptopmag...security-4.aspx

I like that it is being called "light". Most security suites are computer killers (in terms of performance) particularly if you don't have a ton of RAM and a very fast processor. The mere fact that that article recommends Norton's suite makes me question the entire analysis, though.

If you are looking at suites, I'd also consider Avira's suite, Sunbelt Software's VIPRE suite and G Data Internet Security.

Thanks for the info. I know a suite can rob performance but I am so sick of getting trojans and trojan downloaders for which I know idea where they are coming from. Malwarebyte takes care of most of them after the fact and Kaspersky anti-v is clueless. Looking for a better solution before I turn to an Apple product.

#45 Fezmid

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 07:24 AM

Thanks for the info. I know a suite can rob performance but I am so sick of getting trojans and trojan downloaders for which I know idea where they are coming from. Malwarebyte takes care of most of them after the fact and Kaspersky anti-v is clueless. Looking for a better solution before I turn to an Apple product.

The solution is to stop going to the porn sites... :thumbdown:

Seriously though, don't think that Apple products are immune. If you go to risky sites, they're risky regardless of what OS and browser you use.

#46 whateverdude

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 08:05 PM

The solution is to stop going to the porn sites... :w00t:

Seriously though, don't think that Apple products are immune. If you go to risky sites, they're risky regardless of what OS and browser you use.

Doh!! so thats what it is. This is kind of embarrassing but I thought if I looked at porn through Google images I wouldn't get trojans

#47 The Dean

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 09:39 PM

Doh!! so thats what it is. This is kind of embarrassing but I thought if I looked at porn through Google images I wouldn't get trojans



:w00t:

Some will poopoo this, but I recommend adding the WOT security toolbar to your browsers (it's really not a toolbar). It will protect you from going to many bad sites that can infect your computer. It doesn't replace good sense, but it is a quality add onL

http://www.mywot.com/

It is particularly good when using Google images or videos.

#48 Just Jack

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Posted 19 September 2010 - 06:18 PM

How to trash Flash tracking

If you've watched a video on YouTube or any other video-sharing site, you've used Flash. It's a cool way to show movie clips and other animations on your computer. But Adobe, the company behind Flash, built a not-so-cool tracking mechanism into Flash that can be used to keep tabs on what you do on the Web. It's bad news for anyone who values privacy. It's especially bad news if you care about cookies. Many users set up their Web browsers to allow only limited cookies (tiny text files that track what you're doing). A good policy is to reject cookies that come from outside the site your browser is on, which usually blocks advertising cookies and the like. But Flash cookies, Adobe's privacy killer, can't be controlled from your browser's Options or Preferences menu. Why not? Because they're not collected by your Web browser. It doesn't even know about them.

--more at the link above--

#49 The Dean

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Posted 20 September 2010 - 10:11 AM

How to trash Flash tracking

If you've watched a video on YouTube or any other video-sharing site, you've used Flash. It's a cool way to show movie clips and other animations on your computer. But Adobe, the company behind Flash, built a not-so-cool tracking mechanism into Flash that can be used to keep tabs on what you do on the Web. It's bad news for anyone who values privacy. It's especially bad news if you care about cookies. Many users set up their Web browsers to allow only limited cookies (tiny text files that track what you're doing). A good policy is to reject cookies that come from outside the site your browser is on, which usually blocks advertising cookies and the like. But Flash cookies, Adobe's privacy killer, can't be controlled from your browser's Options or Preferences menu. Why not? Because they're not collected by your Web browser. It doesn't even know about them.

--more at the link above--



CCleaner, which I love, also cleans Flash Cookies.