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#61 /dev/null

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 09:23 AM

Another ransomware outbreak has been reported

#62 joesixpack

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 10:16 AM

Another ransomware outbreak has been reported

 

Oh joy. That'll make my life miserable.



#63 Boyst62

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 11:08 AM

Russians

#64 Deranged Rhino

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 12:28 PM

Russians

giphy.gif



#65 Nanker

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 12:31 PM

Now that's a "reset button" we can believe in. 



#66 Deranged Rhino

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 12:33 PM

:lol:  :beer:



#67 OCinBuffalo

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Posted 28 June 2017 - 01:14 AM

Instant replay:

Seems the crooks are always one step ahead of the law in this game. 

 

Change the law.

 

 

 

Seems the crooks are always one step ahead of the law in this game. 

 

 

:lol: Want a do over on that Mead? Someday, somehow, we are going to learn that IT will never be dictated to by law, lawyers, and judges, and certainly not politicians. Does anybody remember GG telling me that Bitcoin would fail? :lol:  Please understand: this is not anarchy. It's merely a different set of "laws" taking the place of outdated concepts...like paper memos replaced by email. 

 

Lawyers/Bankers have operated for centuries as the underlying masters of society. Deep-thinking IT people see many ways to make them obsolete, as well as most of the functions of government.

 

However, other Dumb-Thinking IT people see an opportunity to enact dystopia(see: Facebook's CEO, who couldn't conceive of what his IT betters, at his own company, were doing: React Native. He, like Mark Cuban, should never attended to on IT matters). The trouble: lawyers and bankers have earned their bad rep, and IT people can earn the same bad rep, in much shorter time. If we don't do better at accepting our new responsibilities to society, our profession, and ultimately, ourselves, there will be hell to pay. 

 

Or, in Google's case, there will be the EU to pay: $2.7 billion.

 

The obvious.

state sponsored terrorism is not prosecutable.

The also obvious.

Since that is true, we are not bound by court procedure. If I go and fry 30 Iranian severs, I'm not prosecutable either. The ONLY reason many haven't: Obama Administration, and especially during the Iran deal. Now? It's open season. I've got a few ideas I'd like to try, and I've heard others say the same. But remember: the best hack is the one nobody hears about. One that is so damaging, that the victim is better off pretending it never happened. We'll never know who the "best thief of all time" was...because they were the best.

 

CIA and NSA created a host of cyber weapons, kept them unclassified so they could share said weapons with unvetted contractors, and in a very direct way released the tools into the wild. They were also hacked in 2014 and lost a whole batch of cyber weapons - which they've been using as a cover but in reality they spread the tools themselves while paying US companies to keep back door exploits open.

That is absolutely true...except for the "paying" part. When I did a portal gig for the Navy, they put all sorts of strange requirements, strange polymorphic functions/extra parameters, and interfaces to nowhere in, especially at the last minute before a release, so my guys were always frustrated into just banging out something quick that would work, but was crap. Every day I don't work in Java since that...is a good day.

 

When we finished, we all agreed that they had 0 interest in our production code. It was spaghetti. They said they loved it, thanked us, paid us for both the project and add-on work we didn't do, and kicked us to the curb. It seemed clear they were just going to reverse engineer everything we did and build it all from scratch, with their own code.

 

I have heard versions of this story many times. However, they don't pay us to create back doors. More likely, they force software companies into unwittingly creating back doors, or, they do what they did on my gig: make ridiculous requirements that allow them to fanangle back doors, by seeing how we respond to them.

 

 


#68 4merper4mer

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Posted 28 June 2017 - 08:21 AM

Instant replay:

 

 

 

 

 

:lol: Want a do over on that Mead? Someday, somehow, we are going to learn that IT will never be dictated to by law, lawyers, and judges, and certainly not politicians. Does anybody remember GG telling me that Bitcoin would fail? :lol:  Please understand: this is not anarchy. It's merely a different set of "laws" taking the place of outdated concepts...like paper memos replaced by email. 

 

Lawyers/Bankers have operated for centuries as the underlying masters of society. Deep-thinking IT people see many ways to make them obsolete, as well as most of the functions of government.

 

However, other Dumb-Thinking IT people see an opportunity to enact dystopia(see: Facebook's CEO, who couldn't conceive of what his IT betters, at his own company, were doing: React Native. He, like Mark Cuban, should never attended to on IT matters). The trouble: lawyers and bankers have earned their bad rep, and IT people can earn the same bad rep, in much shorter time. If we don't do better at accepting our new responsibilities to society, our profession, and ultimately, ourselves, there will be hell to pay. 

 

Or, in Google's case, there will be the EU to pay: $2.7 billion.

 

The obvious.

The also obvious.

Since that is true, we are not bound by court procedure. If I go and fry 30 Iranian severs, I'm not prosecutable either. The ONLY reason many haven't: Obama Administration, and especially during the Iran deal. Now? It's open season. I've got a few ideas I'd like to try, and I've heard others say the same. But remember: the best hack is the one nobody hears about. One that is so damaging, that the victim is better off pretending it never happened. We'll never know who the "best thief of all time" was...because they were the best.

 

That is absolutely true...except for the "paying" part. When I did a portal gig for the Navy, they put all sorts of strange requirements, strange polymorphic functions/extra parameters, and interfaces to nowhere in, especially at the last minute before a release, so my guys were always frustrated into just banging out something quick that would work, but was crap. Every day I don't work in Java since that...is a good day.

 

When we finished, we all agreed that they had 0 interest in our production code. It was spaghetti. They said they loved it, thanked us, paid us for both the project and add-on work we didn't do, and kicked us to the curb. It seemed clear they were just going to reverse engineer everything we did and build it all from scratch, with their own code.

 

I have heard versions of this story many times. However, they don't pay us to create back doors. More likely, they force software companies into unwittingly creating back doors, or, they do what they did on my gig: make ridiculous requirements that allow them to fanangle back doors, by seeing how we respond to them.

 

 

 

I can name that tune in 3 notes:

 

I love me.



#69 ALF

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Posted 26 July 2017 - 07:16 AM

ECMC spent nearly $10 million recovering from massive cyberattack
 
Erie County Medical Center didn't pay a nearly $30,000 ransom demand to the perpetrators of a massive cyberattack in April, but the intrusion that brought down the hospital's computer systems will exact a very big cost.
 
ECMC officials estimate expenses tied to the incident were nearly $10 million.
 
About half of that amount is for computer hardware, software and assistance needed in the response. The other half represents a combination of increased expenses, such as for staff overtime pay, and lower revenues from the loss of business during the system down time.
 
Perhaps most importantly, the Grider Street medical center increased its insurance coverage against such events last November from $2 million to $10 million, Quatroche said. He said he is confident the hospital can recover the ransomware-related costs in its insurance claim, and publicly thanked ECMC's general counsel, internal auditors and insurance broker for recommending the increased coverage
 

Edited by ALF, 26 July 2017 - 07:20 AM.


#70 Wacka

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 07:50 AM

Should have had Macs.  33 years of using them. $0 spent on antivirus/ cybersafety software



#71 /dev/null

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 09:29 AM

Should have had Macs.  33 years of using them. $0 spent on antivirus/ cybersafety software


And I bet you've never once even considered how everyone around you is choking on that smug cloud

#72 joesixpack

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 09:30 AM

And I bet you've never once even considered how everyone around you is choking on that smug cloud

 

He's in denial of basic economics. No way malware authors are going to focus on 10% of the market.



#73 /dev/null

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 09:53 AM

 
He's in denial of basic economics. No way malware authors are going to focus on 10% of the market.


Besides the fact there is actually malware written for Macs. But as you said, the market share is so low it's not worth the effort.