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Zero1 helmet making debut in NFL for 25 teams


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#1 Limeaid

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 06:33 PM

https://www.inc.com/...cis-helmet.html

 

Seattle-based startup Vicis has been working since 2013 on a new type of football helmet that's designed to yield on contact. The result is a thud sound, instead of the violent crack players and fans are used to hearing. The softer impact means less trauma to the head, and the theory is that this will reduce the likelihood of brain injuries or concussions.
 
Outside of testing scenarios, Vicis's helmet, called the Zero1, has yet to make its way onto the heads of NFL players--but that's about to change. According to the company, 25 of the NFL's 32 teams have purchased stockpiles of the helmet from Vicis to distribute to their players during practices this spring.
 
The Safety Equipment Institute certified that the helmet met the safety thresholds established by the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE), opening the door for its use in the NFL and NCAA. Last week, the NFL released the results of its annual lab tests that study which helmets best reduce the severity of impact to the head. Of the 33 helmets the NFL tested, the Zero1 finished first--beating out 23 helmets from Riddell and Schutt Sports, two companies that currently account for a combined 90 percent of all football helmet sales.
 
Vicis was founded four years ago by neurosurgeon Sam Browd, engineering professor Per Reinhall, and Dave Marver, former CEO of the Cardiac Science Corporation. The goal: Make a helmet that could reduce football's high rates of concussions and head injuries.
 
"We've learned a lot about how we could make the helmet better and refine it," says Marver, Vicis's CEO. The Zero1 has a soft outer shell and a core layer consisting of a series of bendable columns. These "crumple zones," inspired by and named after the parts of a car meant to crush on impact to reduce the force of a crash, allow it to absorb some of the energy of a collision.
 
This is the type of helmet I have been advocating for years although I'd like it to be able to be used less as weapon.  At $1500 it will not kill budgets of professional teams but I wonder how they determine when the helmet needs to be replaced. Maybe the columns bend but are able to continue to function.

Not sure why my comments did not get added.

 

This is the type of helmet I have been advocating for years. At $1500 each the NFL can afford them but wonder how they will determine if they need to be replaced.  The company does not have a lot of money for advertising and paid spokesmen the way most companies get word out but I think this helmet could make a difference.  



#2 jimmy10

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 07:11 PM

It will be interesting to see if they help. No helmet will stop the brain from crashing into the inside of the skull.

#3 4merper4mer

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 07:21 PM

The 7 teams that don't due this could be very sued if one of their guys gets hurt and can claim the new helmet would have helped.

#4 old school

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 07:23 PM

It will be interesting to see if they help. No helmet will stop the brain from crashing into the inside of the skull.

This, I don't think any helmet would ever stop brain injuries. Less severe, I dunno, maybe. Anything is worth a try though.



#5 Doc

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 07:24 PM

They had these 30 years ago.  They were called the gazoo helmet that Mark Kelso used to wear. 



#6 Limeaid

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 07:53 PM

The gazoo helmet is a different type of helmet.  It is an additional add on to helmet.

 

You have air bags in car - they reduce (absorb) but not stop all damage.

The same thing with helmets - there are two kinds of damage - external and internal and this is to help with external and help with internal.

 

 

 Dr. Bennet Omalu is not only doctor in neurology.



#7 Doc

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 07:55 PM

The gazoo helmet is a different type of helmet.  It is an additional add on to helmet.

 

You have air bags in car - they reduce (absorb) but not stop all damage.

The same thing with helmets - there are two kinds of damage - external and internal and this is to help with external and help with internal.

 

 

 Dr. Bennet Omalu is not only doctor in neurology.

 

I was joking.



#8 KellyToughII

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 08:00 PM

All you will ever be able to do is mitigate the brain damage.

This is why I have every Rookie and every player sign an Assumption of risk waiver to play pro football

Edited by KellyToughII, 16 May 2017 - 08:00 PM.


#9 ocemur

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 08:05 PM

I still think they need to bring back the neck roll. That thing helps a ton. I don't think there is any one solution, but if they can find several ways to reduce the problem, that may be enough to avoid radically changing the game. Trying to police the hits themselves with flags, fines and suspensions is hit or miss, and it;s tipping a QB centric game even more in that direction. The sad thing is it's not hard to pick out the SoB on each team who has a ton of scars on the top of his helmet from using it as a weapon.



#10 Doc

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 08:14 PM

All you will ever be able to do is mitigate the brain damage.

This is why I have every Rookie and every player sign an Assumption of risk waiver to play pro football

 

A friend and I were discussed this.  We both thought it would be a great idea for the NFL, but I said that since they haven't already done it, they can't do it. 



#11 jeremy2020

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 10:47 PM

They have been trying better helmets for a long time. The players end up being the force against safer helmets because they feel they do something such as restrict head movement that decreases their performance and costs them money. Maybe this helmet or one of the others being worked on will be the one that finally meets the players requirements.



#12 QuoteTheRaven83

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 11:20 PM

Best solution is to get rid of the helmets altogether and force players to tackle with proper technique. 



#13 jr1

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 11:51 PM

make this mandatory for 2017 and see how it goes



#14 LeGOATski

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 12:17 AM

And they made it look like just a normal helmet...style points

#15 jjmac

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 04:31 AM

Any way to know if the Bills got these helmets?

#16 dollars 2 donuts

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 04:34 AM

I still think they need to bring back the neck roll. That thing helps a ton. I don't think there is any one solution, but if they can find several ways to reduce the problem, that may be enough to avoid radically changing the game. Trying to police the hits themselves with flags, fines and suspensions is hit or miss, and it;s tipping a QB centric game even more in that direction. The sad thing is it's not hard to pick out the SoB on each team who has a ton of scars on the top of his helmet from using it as a weapon.


Great post, ocemur. However, the one thing I disagree with is that you say there are several ways to reduce the problem, but take out trying to police the game. I think they should keep that up and I Do believe that they can change the game, tackling wise, without radically changing the game. It's just that they are not even trying. Full body or wrap up tackles would change things immensely, as well as the removal of the "pop" hit tackles on both passing and running plays.

For example, on sideline running plays you either tackle th guy or push him out of bounds.

You're unable to? Too bad.
A guy caught a great looking pass over the middle because I couldn't "pop" him. Too bad.

I truly believe you can still have good football and save these guys' lives and careers at the same time.

#17 Thurman#1

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 04:37 AM

It will be interesting to see if they help. No helmet will stop the brain from crashing into the inside of the skull.

 

 

Stop it? No. But lessening the impact lessens the crashing.



#18 jimmy10

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 05:41 AM

 
 
Stop it? No. But lessening the impact lessens the crashing.


Lessens the crashing against the outside of your head, yes. There's a second crash that takes place inside your skull when your head stops but your brain keeps going. I'm not sure any helmet will really help with that. But I am also not a scientist, and hope that they have figured something out here.

#19 I'm Spartacus

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 12:41 PM

I always thought the leather helmets were the best.



#20 John from Hemet

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 12:45 PM

What they need to do is make rugby tackle training manditory